One Tree Woodwork

Custom woodworking and art

Turning Old houses into “Green”

When one talks about the very important topic of “green” homes,”renewable resources”,”carbon footprint”,”environmental degradation” and host of other fancy terminology one must not forget that sometimes the greenest thing to do is to keep and restore. You don’t necessarily need to go buy bamboo floors or cork walls that have been sourced from (sustainable) sources that will no doubt be out of “style” in 20 years or less. Stay cool,stay classic, keep, restore and refinish those floors and paint those walls. Because real “style” is always in season. Yea I know I use to many “quotations”….Frankly my dear I don’t give a damn.

Borrowed from Wikipedia below-

Green building (also known as green construction or sustainable building) refers to a structure and using process that is environmentally responsible and resource-efficient throughout a building’s life-cycle: from siting to design, construction, operation, maintenance, renovation, and demolition. This requires close cooperation of the design team, the architects, the engineers, and the client at all project stages.[1] The Green Building practice expands and complements the classical building design concerns of economy, utility, durability, and comfort.[2]

What I’m trying to say is that sometimes people are to busy attempting to be “green” and use the most efficient window or the most “sustainable” countertop material that they forget and loose sight that the “greenest” thing they could do might just be to refinish,recycle and reuse what they might already have. Then when at the “farmers market” while wearing their beanie hat woven from locally sourced Alpaca they can casually mention how small their “carbon footprint” really is since restoring their house with “locally sourced carpenters”.

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3 comments on “Turning Old houses into “Green”

  1. Crystal Jackson
    August 15, 2014

    “Locally sourced carpenters” = ha! And your point is well taken. Don’t just buy the new stuff with the “I’m green!” sticker, apply green thinking to the entire process.

    Love the details above. What’s the shamrock part of? Also, we have a bench exactly like the red one, only ours is yellow. Which I guess means it’s not really “exactly” like the red one. You know what I mean.

    • TOHNER JACKSON
      August 15, 2014

      Yea, the whole building world is full of companies that push the “green” aspect to the prospective homeowners and often the only real “green” thing that’s happening is the companies lining their pockets. It’s the same thing that has happened to words like artisan,organic and local which all represent good and honest things that have all been corrupted and monetized to sell sell sell.

      Yea thanks I think we all were a little surprised of how well the house came out,it was about as rough a before pic as it gets. The shamrock is cut into an antique shutter pretty bad ass. Yea those benches have great lines

  2. orepass
    August 17, 2014

    The house came out great! I agree with you on the green comments. I sit back in amazement at some of the things that claim to be green.

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This entry was posted on August 15, 2014 by in Homebuilding and tagged , , , , , .

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